Ethiopian Cookbook (Planet Cookbooks)

Ethiopian Cookbook A Beginner’s Guide This book has been written in support of millions of Africans in need. Proceeds from the sale of this book will help bring about change for suffering African communities. Ethiopian Cookbook has been requested by the President of GOURMAND INTERNATIONAL and the PARIS COOKBOOK FAIR to compete in the 2013 Gourmand World Cookbook Awards in Madrid, Spain. Delicious and Delightful – the exquisite flavours of Ethiopia are utterly divine. From the spices to the presentation method, a meal in Ethiopia is an experience! In this book you will learn a little about everything – from Ethiopian landscape and culture to food and traditions. You may even learn a few words in Amharic! This indispensable book contains 28 wonderful recipes that you will use over and over again. Each recipe is easy to follow and beautifully photographed. You are certain to find something to learn and enjoy in this Ethiopian Cookbook. For information on additional culinary ventures aiding Extreme Poverty around the world, please visit us online at www.PlanetCookbooks.com.

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3 comments

  1. 1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Good basic recipes, June 22, 2013
    By 
    C. W. Jerome (Naples, Italy)
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Ethiopian Cookbook (Planet Cookbooks) (Paperback)
    This cookbook is a good start to those that are looking to add Ethiopian cooking to their culinary toolbox. Very easy directions to follow, and a good selection of Wat (stews) to choose from. I love that they included recipes for Berbere and Niter Kibbeh. I would give it a fifth star if it had more recipes, but as I said, a good foundational book.
  2. 42 of 46 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Operative Word: “Beginner”, June 4, 2012
    By 
    T. A. Strand (Albuquerque NM)
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Ethiopian Cookbook (Planet Cookbooks) (Paperback)
    Some time ago, I lent out my copy of the venerable “Exotic Ethiopian” cookbook, with its numerous recipes and extensive cultural background, and never got it back. It’s available via Amazon but it’ll cost you until it’s reprinted. This new book makes me miss it all the more. “Ethiopian Cookbook – A Beginner’s Guide” isn’t quite what the title suggests since there’s not much ‘guiding’ offered. Its meagre 28 pages (of large type), and half of them full-page photos, means that the reader and cook will get only a cross section of dishes and, as other reviewers have noted, the recipes are “adapted” to non-Ethiopian kitchens. A lot gets lost in the translation. Most notable, of course, is the shortcut recipe for ingera which uses whole wheat or buckwheat instead of teff, which is readily available now in many stores. The result is pancakes and blini’s, not our beloved, sweet-sour fermented ingera. Admittedly, the real thing is very hard to make, but it’s better to get it sent from the distributers who air-freight packages of them than to miss out on the authentic taste. I would recommend this new book only for a cook who’s interested in a general introduction to this cuisine, but for the serious devotee of this addictive tradition: save up for the rare green masterpiece Exotic Ethiopian Cooking : Sociey, Culture, Hospitality, and Traditions. Revised Extended Edition. 178 Tested Recipes. With Food Composition Tables. or wait until a more comprehensive book comes out.
  3. 15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Tasty recipes, but not Ethiopian, September 25, 2012
    By 
    Joseph Romatowski (Seattle, Wa.)
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Ethiopian Cookbook (Planet Cookbooks) (Paperback)
    Paradoxically, this cookbook earns both zero stars and five stars. Zero because none of the recipes taste Ethiopian. Five because the food is easy to prepare and tastes great.

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